Micronutrients in milk and milk-based food products
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Micronutrients in milk and milk-based food products

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Published by Elsevier Applied Science, Sole distributor in the USA and Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co. in London, New York, New York, NY, USA .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Milk -- Composition.,
  • Dairy products -- Composition.,
  • Trace elements in nutrition.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by E. Renner.
ContributionsRenner, Edmund.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTX556.M5 M53 1989
The Physical Object
Paginationxiv, 311 p. :
Number of Pages311
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2055120M
ISBN 101851663096
LC Control Number88033389

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Book chapter: Micronutrients in milk and milk-based food products. pp ref pp. of Abstract: The 8 sections of this chapter review the following milk components: lipids lipids Subject Category: Chemicals and Chemical GroupsCited by: Abstract. Milk and dairy products contain micronutrients such as minerals and vitamins, which contribute to multiple and different vital functions in the organism. The mineral fraction is composed of macroelements (Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, and Cl) and oligoelements (Fe, Cu, Zn, and Se). From a physicochemical point of view, the chemical forms, the Cited by: Micronutrients in Milk and Milk-Based Food Products: Renner, E.: Books - at: Hardcover. Scott, K.J. and Bishop, D.R. () Nutrient content of milk and milk products: vitamins of the B complex and vitamin C in retail market milk and milk products, J. Soc. Dairy Technol., 39, 32– CrossRef Google Scholar.

Results: Despite their low energy contribution (10%–13% of energy), milk and milk products contributed 47% of calcium, 42% of retinol, and 65% of vitamin D to the diets of children and adults. Milk and milk products were among the top sources of riboflavin, phosphorous, and vitamin B About 50% of young children in Tanzania suffer from protein-energyundernutrition (PEU) while more than 45% of children under the age offive suffer from various micronutrient deficiency disorders. The immediatecause of these conditions is inadequate intake and poor utilization ofnutrients, which begins in the weaning period and amplifies in thesubsequent years. Products of lipolysis, including diacylglycerols, monoacylglycerols, and FFAs, were found in human milk unless new milk was extracted and analyzed immediately after sample collection. Storage temperature at –20°C is not low enough to preserve the integrity of the milk lipid, for it results in hydrolysis of TGs and the appearance of FFAs (66). Milk contains high quality protein, carbohydrate in the form of lactose, as well as different fatty acids and a wide range of micronutrients including vitamins, minerals and trace elements. Milk is a natural source of calcium, vitamin B12, riboflavin (vitamin B2), phosphorus and potassium.

Milk is widely consumed, thus the fortification of milk and milk-products could provide vital nutrition to a large proportion of the world’s populace. Milk is a natural highly nutritious food. The first edition of this book rapidly established a reputation for providing a unique source of highly practical information on dairy product technology. Coverage is of products in which milk is either the main component or a less obvious ingredient. This new edition continues to explain methods of milk product manufacture, the technology involved, and how other influences affect finished 5/5(3). This chapter focuses on the interactions of milk proteins with a range of micronutrients, including vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, and sugars. Research in the past decade has shown that milk proteins can be used as micronutrient carriers in foods, thereby increasing the nutritional benefit of milk and milk-based products. This chapter focuses on the interactions of milk proteins with a range of micronutrients, including vitamins, fatty acids, sugars, and minerals. Milk proteins can potentially be used as micronutrient carriers in foods, thereby increasing the nutritional benefit of milk and milk-based products.